Writing in Practice: call for articles

Submissions for Volume 3 of NAWE’s journal are currently invited, with a deadline of 5pm (GMT), 17 June 2016

writing-in-practice

The National Association of Writers in Education (NAWE) is seeking articles that explore the art of imaginative writing of all kinds, from an authorial perspective, highlighting and evolving current academic thinking and practice. Creative Writing itself is welcomed when integral to an article.

Submissions should be in the region of 4000–10,000 words, and include an abstract of up to 200 words. All submissions will be peer reviewed, with feedback given by early October 2016.

Before submitting their work, contributors must ensure that they read the style guide, downloadable to the right. Submissions that ignore these guidelines may be ignored.

Volume 3 editors are Craig Batty, Helena Blakemore and Shelagh Weeks. Submissions should be in the region of 4-10,000 words, and include an abstract of up to 200 words. All submissions will be anonymously peer reviewed, with feedback given by early October 2016.

Contributors must submit their work using NAWE’s online system here.

The deadline for submissions is 5pm (GMT) on 17 June 2016.

Further information

The aim of Writing in practice is to encourage research in the field of Creative Writing. NAWE recognizes that this research is principally undertaken through the act of creating. Creative Writing academics invest knowledge and understanding into their creative practice, and use existing knowledge to help innovate and evolve their own work and the broader subject. The articulated results of this often practice-led and/or practice-based research demonstrate and develop existing subject knowledge.

The National Association of Writers in Education seeks scholarly articles about practice and process that contextualize, reflect on and respond to existing knowledge and understanding in the form of poetics and/or exegesis. Creative Writing itself is welcome when integral to an article. While NAWE also welcome critical examinations of the international history and pedagogy of Creative Writing, such work must evidence a wide-reading and contextualization of the existing literature, and make a significant and well-articulated contribution to knowledge in those fields.

About NAWE

www.nawe.co.uk